Will's story

Will was simply awesome. We couldn’t have wished for a better son. Most parents’ sentiments I guess, but so true for Joanna and I.

From an early age Will was an early adopter. He adopted or borrowed his big sister’s voice for about four years, as talking just seemed too much of an effort. The energy he saved went towards reading. It’s startling even now to remember how much he read, what he read and how early he read. He was in at the beginning with Harry Potter. Another early adoption.

Will seemed beyond clever. He took intelligence to a whole new level. One not seen in the Garvey household previously, anyhow. Though his star was bright, his humble self-deprecating manner acted as perfect shade to keep him grounded and modest.

If I were to create a collage of Will’s early years, it would be bountiful with images of squirming in barber’s chairs’, sun burnt toes, grumpy in France, giggles and Mario Cart. There’d be Toblerones and hoarded Easter Eggs, trumpet playings of jazz. Peter Pan and Harems and Sultans and smiles. It would be a funny and warm collage, it’d be chock a with life, which of course rhymes with cocker, my term of endearment for him.

From an early age Will was an early adopter. He adopted or borrowed his big sister’s voice for about four years, as talking just seemed too much of an effort. The energy he saved went towards reading. It’s startling even now to remember how much he read, what he read and how early he read. He was in at the beginning with Harry Potter. Another early adoption.

Will seemed beyond clever. He took intelligence to a whole new level. One not seen in the Garvey household previously, anyhow. Though his star was bright, his humble self-deprecating manner acted as perfect shade to keep him grounded and modest.

If I were to create a collage of Will’s early years, it would be bountiful with images of squirming in barber’s chairs’, sun burnt toes, grumpy in France, giggles and Mario Cart. There’d be Toblerones and hoarded Easter Eggs, trumpet playings of jazz. Peter Pan and Harems and Sultans and smiles. It would be a funny and warm collage, it’d be chock a with life, which of course rhymes with cocker, my term of endearment for him.

As a teen Will adopted his sister. Or so she claimed. Rose often said he was more of a stern scolding father figure then me, her actual dad. He also adopted a social conscience and championed the underdog; the marginalised, the voiceless. He was righteous, rebellious and occasionally a little ridiculous. And as he matured so did his humour. The more he aired it the drier it became, although sarcastic it was never sardonic. But he still giggled and how he lit a room up when he giggled.

He was a star student: excelled in both GCSEs and A-Levels, study just came effortlessly to him. Though, his too relaxed persona did raise the ire of his fellow students when he slept in for his Physics GCSE and they all had to wait in the hall until he had arrived to start their exam!

In his teens he discovered music. He lived for music. He early adopted music acts such as Jake Bugg before everyone else. Glastonbury adopted him. It allowed him to “touch the sky”.

He discovered food and beer, another early adoption was Annie’s Burger Shack. He was fascinated and besotted by the stats, the nuance and the sheer raw emotion of football. Though sadly, he never really witnessed a truly successful Nottingham Forest team.

As a teen Will adopted his sister. Or so she claimed. Rose often said he was more of a stern scolding father figure then me, her actual dad. He also adopted a social conscience and championed the underdog; the marginalised, the voiceless. He was righteous, rebellious and occasionally a little ridiculous. And as he matured so did his humour. The more he aired it the drier it became, although sarcastic it was never sardonic. But he still giggled and how he lit a room up when he giggled.

He was a star student: excelled in both GCSEs and A-Levels, study just came effortlessly to him. Though, his too relaxed persona did raise the ire of his fellow students when he slept in for his Physics GCSE and they all had to wait in the hall until he had arrived to start their exam!

In his teens he discovered music. He lived for music. He early adopted music acts such as Jake Bugg before everyone else. Glastonbury adopted him. It allowed him to “touch the sky”.

He discovered food and beer, another early adoption was Annie’s Burger Shack. He was fascinated and besotted by the stats, the nuance and the sheer raw emotion of football. Though sadly, he never really witnessed a truly successful Nottingham Forest team.

Into his late teens and early twenties anxiety and depression crept in, though through this he still smiled and giggled and still he pressed on. After smashing his A-levels, he went onto Leeds University where he made new and lifelong friends. He discovered American Football, adopting the Indianapolis Colts as his team, and as a family we have also adopted them.

He discovered travel, got further and deeper into music whilst his passion for the dispossessed still burned brightly despite his struggles. The last few months of his life he became a little more withdrawn, though he never complained or sought pity. We will never really understand why Will took that decision to end his life and never understand how low he was to take such a final act. However, we know that his light shone and still shines brightly and there isn’t a moment goes by when we don’t think about him and wish he was still here.

Into his late teens and early twenties anxiety and depression crept in, though through this he still smiled and giggled and still he pressed on. After smashing his A-levels, he went onto Leeds University where he made new and lifelong friends. He discovered American Football, adopting the Indianapolis Colts as his team, and as a family we have also adopted them.

He discovered travel, got further and deeper into music whilst his passion for the dispossessed still burned brightly despite his struggles. The last few months of his life he became a little more withdrawn, though he never complained or sought pity. We will never really understand why Will took that decision to end his life and never understand how low he was to take such a final act. However, we know that his light shone and still shines brightly and there isn’t a moment goes by when we don’t think about him and wish he was still here.

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on whatsapp
Share on linkedin

Share

Press the ‘ Hide page ‘ button to go quickly to ‘google.co.uk‘.

 

For great advice (from Childline) on covering

your tracks, click  ‘ Cover tracks ‘ button

                                                                                                                                       

Trustee Corner

Important information

Just need to let you know that all materials referenced below are to help you to help someone and that Will Garvey Trust Foundation cannot be responsible for their content or use. Here we provide links (signposts) for you, for example to other websites, videos and podcasts provided by other organisations and groups. Please use the information and resources responsibly and review any policies or disclaimers applicable at the referenced sites.